Police in South Carolina Arrest Woman to Force Smart Meter in Blatant, Illegal Overreach

Police in South Carolina Arrest Woman to Force Smart Meter in Blatant, Illegal Overreach

Because utilities have no legal mandate to force smart meters on private property, the sheriff in this case is acting outside of the law, and must be held accountable. We must rally and support Michelle and all other victims of smart grid abuse– we stand in solidarity! Note that being arrested for refusing a smart meter is thankfully not (yet) the norm in the rest of the country.

Contact: E. Michelle Mancini • blufftonsc@icloud.com

Bluffton, South Carolina, February 19, 2018 A Sheriff arrested and jailed a woman after she had a smart meter on her home changed to an analog meter due to health issues from the radiation. The arrest warrant for Elizabeth Michelle Mancini states that Palmetto Electric Cooperative, Inc., did not approve the meter, and could not read it.

Ms. Mancini, a Technical Writer with no criminal record, stated, “Palmetto did not, and could not rebut my affidavit of claims related to their having put an unsafe and invasive meter on my home. I didn’t violate any law because I was simply acting in self-defense against an unlawful meter.” She said she had no intent to defraud the utility company, and that “Utilities have been able to read analog meters for over 70 years–a third grader can do it.”

Ms. Mancini began requesting Palmetto to remove their smart meter in 2015, to protect her health and her Fourth Amendment right to privacy in the home. Ms. Mancini described going through an administrative process, serving the CEO of the power company with a “Notice and Demand,” and a subsequent “Notice of Default,” prior to installing a safe, hardwired analog meter. She returned the smart meter, undamaged, to the CEO of Palmetto and included photos of all readings for meter reading purposes and to show she was not attempting to defraud the company. Armed officers came to her home and made the arrest.

“All of us are being harmed by excessive radiation, but only a small percentage of the population are clinically sensitive to radio frequencies. There was no compelling public interest to strip search and shackle me, and there is no public benefit to my prosecution. These so-called smart meters are a profitable fraud. The crime is Palmetto’s gross negligence regarding the health effects from these meters, and also the violation of our right to privacy within the home. They are simultaneously harming and spying on trusting, innocent customers under the guise of delivering the most basic human needs.

Ms. Mancini made recordings of the police when they invaded her home, but law enforcement scrubbed the recordings. (a partial recording is available below)

“I hope my arrest will help lead to people joining together to refuse this technology. Easements are not open ended and do not include the forcing of a radiation emitting surveillance device,” she said. Ms. Mancini has requested a

This entry was posted in Citizen rebellionDemocracyElectro-Hyper-Sensitivityhealth effectsInstaller Threats and Assaultslegal issuesPrivacyradio-frequency radiationSafetySmart GridSouth Carolina. Bookmark the permalink.

Environment Report: Lawsuit Targets Smart Water Meters

Environment Report: Lawsuit Targets Smart Water Meters

Activists are trying to make San Diego Gas & Electric a greener company, the Surfrider Foundation proposes a ban on Styrofoam and more in our biweekly roundup of environmental news.

Last week, San Diego’s water department got hit with a lawsuit over how it’s paying to install 280,000 new “smart” meters across the city

The lawsuit is based on Proposition 218, one of California’s strict anti-tax laws.

The new meters are eventually supposed to eliminate the need for meter readers by automatically sending water use data to the city, but the program has been delayed, in part by other funding issues.

The suit is a class action filed by San Diego-based attorney Paul Neuharth Jr. and Seattle-based attorney Robert Teel on behalf of Miller Marks, a San Diego resident and sewer customer. It alleges the department is mixing two pots of money that are supposed be separated to find the $67 million needed to install the meters. The first pot comes from the city’s drinking water customers. The second pot comes from the city’s sewer customers.

For the most part, these two groups overlap — if you get water, you have sewage. But the city also treats sewage for more than a dozen neighboring cities and water agencies. Money from those cities also ends up in the second pot.

The lawsuit claims sewer customers from across the region are paying for water meters in the city for no good reason. The lawsuit was first reported by NBC San Diego.

The lawsuit also alludes to the relatively large reserves that the city has had in its sewer fund for years — several hundred million dollars, enough to fund about two years of operations.

The lawsuit has a long way to go, but it’s based in part on worries from members of the city’s Independent Rates Oversight Committee.

The oversight committee’s chairman, Gordon Hess, has also wondered if the city can justify splitting the cost of the meter installations evenly, because city water meters are read six times a year to determine city customers’ water bills but only two of those readings are used to calculate sewer rates. If the meters are used less than half the time to calculate sewer rates, why should sewer customers pay half the cost of new meters?

Before the lawsuit was filed, water department spokesman Jerry McCormick said there was “no formal study” that justifies the way the city is paying for the program, but the department could still defend its decision to split the costs. He said the funding deal was made in consultation with the city attorney’s office and there are benefits to sewer customers from new meters that “may not be immediately apparent,” like coming up with detailed models of how the sewer system is used, which can help operations.

More Direct Democracy

Back when the city was considering a series of water rate increases in 2015, we wrote about Proposition 218 and how city water customers could protest the rate increase. If a majority protested, a rate increase would be stopped in its tracks.

There’s a similar arrangement in San Diego Gas & Electric’s deal to operate within city limits. Environmentalists are hoping to use the negotiations of a new deal to force SDG&E to quickly become a greener company.

But voters have their own power. In the 1970 agreement the power company signed with the city, voters are allowed to revoke or amend the agreement on their own at any election.

https://www.voiceofsandiego.org/topics/science-environment/environment-report-lawsuit-targets-smart-water-meters/

Verify: Will new bill force Missourians to get ‘smart’ electricity meter?

Verify: Will new bill force Missourians to get ‘smart’ electricity meter

On Monday, members of the House will discuss legislation to cap how electric rates are set, in return for an upgrade to the power grid.

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. – Changes could be coming to how you pay for utility bills in Missouri.

On Monday, members of the House will discuss legislation to cap how electric rates are set, in return for an upgrade to the power grid.

Senate Bill 564 passed out of the Senate and now will be debated in the house.

One of those upgrades could include smart meters allowing utilities to read meters remotely. But there seems to be some confusion as to what this will mean for families.

Alyssa Drinkard, 22, suffers from hypersensitivity to lights. The symptoms set in following a car crash four years ago. Her condition bans her from being around bright lights and using things like Wi-Fi and wireless phones. She also wouldn’t be able to have a smart meter in her house and she’s worried this bill will force her to upgrade.

“It wouldn’t be livable. The symptoms that I would be having, the heart palpations, it’s not like you can turn it off at night, flip a switch and go to sleep,” said Drinkard.

But the bill’s sponsor, Sen. Ed Emery, R-Lamar, said that’s not true. He said the bill would not force people to get smart meters.

He said there’s an opt-out and that the cost would not be much more a month. He also said the rates would be decided by the Public Service Commission.

How smartphones are heating up the planet: Experts warn the devices will contribute to 125 MEGATONS of carbon dioxide emissions by 2020

How smartphones are heating up the planet: Experts warn the devices will contribute to 125 MEGATONS of carbon dioxide emissions by 2020

  • Smartphone users are contributing to global warming, too, a new report says
  • PCs, monitors, laptops and tablets also contribute to the problem
  • A McMaster University professor is arguing that the issue should be tackled now
  • Professor Lotfi Belkhir suggests making data centers run on renewable energy
  • His argument was published in an essay on The Conversation 

When we think about climate change, the main sources of carbon emissions that come to mind for most of us are heavy industries like petroleum, mining and transportation.

Rarely do we point the finger at computer technologies.

In fact, many experts view the cyber-world of information and computer technologies (ICT) as our potential savior, replacing many of our physical activities with a lower-carbon virtual alternative.

That is not what our study, recently published in the Journal of Cleaner Production, suggests.

McMaster University Professor Lotfi Belkhir has argued that smartphones, computers, tablets, PCs and monitors are  heating up the earth. Among other suggestions, Professor Belkhir said that it is important to make all data centers run on renewable energy (file photo)

(McMaster University Professor Lotfi Belkhir has argued that smartphones, computers, tablets, PCs and monitors are heating up the earth. Among other suggestions, Professor Belkhir said that it is important to make all data centers run on renewable energy (file photo)

Having conducted a meticulous and fairly exhaustive inventory of the contribution of ICT – including devices like PCs, laptops, monitors, smartphones and tablets – and infrastructure like data centers and communication networks, we found that the relative contribution of ICT to the total global footprint is expected to grow from about one percent in 2007 to 3.5 percent by 2020 and reach 14 percent by 2040.

That’s more than half the relative contribution of the entire transportation sector worldwide.

Another disconcerting finding is that all this extraordinary growth is mostly incremental, essentially shattering the hope that ICT will help reduce the global carbon footprint by substituting physical activities with their virtual counterparts.

The impact of smartphones

Perhaps the most surprising result of our study was the disproportionate contribution of smartphones relative to the overall ICT footprint.

We found that the relative emissions share of smartphones is expected to grow from four percent in 2010 to 11 percent by 2020, dwarfing the individual contributions of PCs, laptops and computer displays.

In absolute values, emissions caused by smartphones will jump from 17 to 125 megatons of CO2 equivalent per year (Mt-CO2e/yr) in that time span, or a 730 percent growth.

The lion’s share of this footprint (85 to 95 percent) will be caused not by the use of the device, but rather by its production. That includes, in addition to the manufacturing energy, the energy for material mining for gold and the so-called rare-earth elements like yttrium, lanthanium and several others that today are almost exclusively available from China.

Another guilty participant in this excessive carbon footprint are the phone plans that encourage users to get a new smartphone every two years.

That accelerates the rate at which older models become obsolete and leads to an extraordinary and unnecessary amount of waste.

These findings pertain to the device side.

Every text, download, email uses server energy 

On the infrastructure side, we predict the combined footprint of data centers and communications networks will grow from 215 megatons of C02 equivalent a year (Mt-CO2e/yr) in 2007 to 764 MtCO2-e/yr by 2020, with data centers accounting for about two-thirds of the total contribution.

Professor Belkhir also said that, on an individual level, it would help if people recycled their smartphones when purchasing a new one. He cited alarming research claiming that only one percent of smartphones are recycled (file photo)

Professor Belkhir also said that, on an individual level, it would help if people recycled their smartphones when purchasing a new one. He cited alarming research claiming that only one percent of smartphones are recycled (file photo)

For comparison purposes, the entire carbon footprint of Canada was about 730 MtCO2-e in 2016 and is expected to decrease by 2020.

The growth in smartphones and data centers aren’t unrelated.

Indeed, it’s the dizzying growth in mobile communications that’s largely driving the pace for data centers. For every text message, video download, photo exchange, email or chat, there’s a 24/7 power-hungry server in some data center that’s making it happen.

It’s the energy consumption that we don’t see.

Software companies spur growth

Finally, and perhaps the most ironic aspect of all this, is that it’s software that is driving the overall growth in ICT as a whole, devices and infrastructure included.

Software companies like Google, Facebook, Amazon, Microsoft and Yahoo boast some of the largest data centers in the world. The rise in dominance of the mobile operating systems, namely Apple’s iOS and Google’s Android, along with the millions of mobile applications that are built on top of those platforms, has spawned the mobile communication age.

The incredible – as well as unsustainable – growth in the emission footprint of all this hardware is there for only one purpose: to support and serve the software universe.

ARE YOU ONE OF THE NEARLY 50% OF SMARTPHONE USERS ADDICTED TO THEIR HANDSET?

Worrying research published in December 2017 revealed we reach for our smartphones around 4,000 times a year for no apparent reason.

Each day we unlock our phone 28 times – and over a third of the time this is compulsive and unnecessary.

The apps we crave most are Facebook, followed by WhatsApp, Gmail and Instagram, the survey found.

Experts from Malta-based online casino Casumo.com looked at 2,000 UK smartphone users in order to find out whether checking their device was out of habit or necessity.

The average American clicks, taps or swipes on their smartphone screen more than 2,600 times a day, with some reaching an astonishing 5,400 times

The average American clicks, taps or swipes on their smartphone screen more than 2,600 times a day, with some reaching an astonishing 5,400 times

They found more than 40 percent of the 10,000 times users check smartphones each year is ‘compulsive’.

The top ten percent of users check their phones more than 60 times a day.

More than one in three people think they are addicted to checking their phone with the average user spending nearly an hour each day on their phone.

The survey also found Google Maps is considered the most useful app while WhatsApp and Gmail come second and third.

Google Chrome is fourth and Facebook comes in fifth.

In other words, while it’s the hardware that does all the dirty work, it’s the software that’s calling all the shots.

The way out?

At the societal level, we must demand that all data centers run exclusively on renewable energy.

At the individual level: Hold on to your smartphone for as long as you can, and, when you do upgrade, make sure you recycle your old one. Sadly, only one percent of smartphones are being recycled today.

This article was originally published by The Conversation.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-5547227/Experts-warn-smartphones-contribute-125-MEGATONS-emissions-2020.html#ixzz5AyfsHTCS
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook

 

How smartphones are heating up the planet

How smartphones are heating up the planet

When we think about climate change, the main sources of carbon emissions that come to mind for most of us are heavy industries like petroleum, mining and transportation.

Rarely do we point the finger at computer technologies.

In fact, many experts view the cyber-world of information and computer technologies (ICT) as our potential saviour, replacing many of our physical activities with a lower-carbon virtual alternative.

That is not what our study, recently published in the Journal of Cleaner Production, suggests.

Having conducted a meticulous and fairly exhaustive inventory of the contribution of ICT —including devices like PCs, laptops, monitors, smartphones and tablets — and infrastructure like data centres and communication networks, we found that the relative contribution of ICT to the total global footprint is expected to grow from about one per cent in 2007 to 3.5 per cent by 2020 and reaching 14 per cent by 2040.

That’s more than half the relative contribution of the entire transportation sector worldwide.

Another disconcerting finding is that all this extraordinary growth is mostly incremental, essentially shattering the hope that ICT will help reduce the global carbon footprint by substituting physical activities with their virtual counterparts.

The impact of smartphones

Perhaps the most surprising result of our study was the disproportionate contribution of smartphones relative to the overall ICT footprint.

We found that the relative emissions share of smartphones is expected to grow from four per cent in 2010 to 11 per cent by 2020, dwarfing the individual contributions of PCs, laptops and computer displays.

In absolute values, emissions caused by smartphones will jump from 17 to 125 megatons of CO2 equivalent per year (Mt-CO2e/yr) in that time span, or a 730 per cent growth.

The lion’s share of this footprint (85 to 95 per cent) will be caused not by the use of the device, but rather by its production. That includes, in addition to the manufacturing energy, the energy for material mining for gold and the so-called rare-earth elements like yttrium, lanthanium and several others that today are almost exclusively available only from China.

Want to help combat climate change? Stop replacing your phone every two years.(Shutterstock)

Another guilty participant in this excessive carbon footprint are the phone plans that encourage users to get a new smartphone every two years. That accelerates the rate at which older models become obsolete and leads to an extraordinary and unnecessary amount of waste.

These findings pertain to the device side.

Every text, download, email uses server energy

On the infrastructure side, we predict the combined footprint of data centres and communications networks will grow from 215 megatons of C02 equivalent a year (Mt-CO2e/yr) in 2007 to 764 MtCO2-e/yr by 2020, with data centres accounting for about two thirds of the total contribution.

Data centres are an increasing source of carbon emissions. (Shutterstock)

For comparison purposes, the entire carbon footprint of Canada was about 730 MtCO2-e in 2016 and is expected to decrease by 2020.

The growth in smartphones and data centres aren’t unrelated.

Indeed, it’s the dizzying growth in mobile communications that’s largely driving the pace for data centres. For every text message, video download, photo exchange, email or chat, there’s a 24/7 power-hungry server in some data centre that’s making it happen.

It’s the energy consumption that we don’t see.

Software companies spur growth

Finally, and perhaps the most ironic aspect of all this, is that it’s software that is driving the overall growth in ICT as a whole, devices and infrastructure included.

Software companies like Google, Facebook, Amazon, Microsoft and Yahoo boast some of the largest data centres in the world. The rise in dominance of the mobile operating systems, namely Apple’s iOS and Google’s Android, along with the millions of mobile applications that are built on top of those platforms, has spawned the mobile communication age.

The incredible —as well as unsustainable— growth in the emission footprint of all this hardware is there for only one purpose: To support and serve the software universe.

In other words, while it’s the hardware that does all the dirty work, it’s the software that’s calling all the shots.

The way out?

At the societal level, we must demand that all data centres run exclusively on renewable energy.

At the individual level: Hold on to your smartphone for as long as you can, and when you do upgrade, make sure you recycle your old one. Sadly, only one per cent of smartphones are being recycled today.

https://theconversation.com/how-smartphones-are-heating-up-the-planet-92793

Increasing incidence of aggressive brain tumour (glioblastoma multiforme) in England during 1995-2015

Increasing incidence of aggressive brain tumour (glioblastoma multiforme) in England during 1995-2015

A recent article describes increasing incidence of the most malignant type of brain tumor, glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) in England during 1995-2015. The number of patients increased from 2.4 to 5.0 per 100,000 during that time period. In total the yearly increase was from 983 to 2,531 patients, thus a substantial number. The incidence of low-grade glioma decreased but was stabilized from 2004, see figure 2. Thus the increasing incidence cannot be explained by low-grade glioma transforming to high-grade (GBM). The authors conclude that a general environmental factor must be the cause.

The increasing incidence is most pronounced for GBM in temporal or frontal parts of the brain, see figure 6. That is parts with highest exposure to radiofrequency radiation from the handheld wireless phone.

The increasing incidence of GBM was seen in all age groups but was most pronounced in those aged more than 55 years.

We published incidence data on brain tumours for the time period 1998-2015 based on the Swedish Cancer Register. In the age group 60-79 years the yearly incidence of high-grade glioma increased statistically significant in men with +1.68% (+0.39, +2.99 %) (n = 2,275) and in women with +1.38% (+0.32, +2.45%) (n = 1,585), see figures. Few patients were diagnosed in the age group 80+ yielding analysis less meaningful. High-grade glioma includes astrocytoma grades III and IV. Astrocytoma grade IV is the same as glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) with bad prognosis, survival about one year or less.

Our results are similar to those now published from England. All results are in agreement with wireless phones (mobile phones and cordless phones) causing glioma.

https://wordpress.com/post/smartmeternewsupdates.wordpress.com/13279

An Electronic Silent Spring – March, 2018 Newsletter from Katie Singer

An Electronic Silent Spring – March, 2018 Newsletter from Katie Singer

In Telecommunications We Trust:

Reports On and Options for Democracy 

by Katie Singer * http://www.electronicsilentspring.com

We’ve always loved telecommunications, even though satisfying the corporations that provide them means paying bills that keep getting higher, using increasing amounts of electricity and natural resources, saturating our world with man-made radiation and giving up privacy. Telecommunications keep whittling away our health, sanity, ecosystems and bank accounts; but few people call the situation dangerous enough to change course.

Now, AT&T, Verizon, Sprint, T-Mobile and other telecoms want our public-right-of-ways (PROWs). The industry deleted the word “public” and calls them right-of-ways (ROWs).

PROWs are utility poles, traffic lights, government building rooftops. Income from leasing PROWs typically goes to a general fund that contributes to a municipality’s police and fire expenses.

Telecom providers need PROW access for 5G–the fifth generation of wireless infrastructure. 5G’s “small” cellular antennas operate at very high frequencies that can carry much more data at faster speeds than 4G. But 5G’s millimeter waves can’t travel far. Effective 5G infrastructure needs ubiquitous, dense deployment of cell sites. This is where public right-of-ways come into play.

But I’ve got to slow down. I’ve got to ask, What do we want from the Internet? What’s its purpose? What do we use to determine its effectiveness? Its ineffectiveness?

The Internet has become a modern necessity that serves the public–like electricity and water. Call it a utility. To last, we’ll need this electronic forum to stick to a sustainable diet of energy and natural resources. We’ll need affordable costs for consumers, net neutrality, increased security and privacy, and speed. I also vote for less spam and less advertising bots.

What does any of this have to do with PROWs?

The industry says we’re ready for the Internet of Things (IoT), wherein videos take only a few seconds to download, and everything is chipped. Diapers and pill bottles can message your smartphone when your baby’s diaper needs changing or your prescription needs a refill. The Cloud stores all medical, banking, travel (at what store do you shop, what do you buy and at what times) and educational records (etc.). We can think less, feed corporations, and grow our economy. The industry projects that the average Westerner will own 26 IoT-connected devices within a few years.

Because the IoT will generate more data and more traffic, we’ll need 5G. Therefore, around the U.S., we have lawmakers introducing bills that let telecom corporations mount cell sites on PROWs without zoning requirements (i.e. neighborhood notification, public hearings, historic board reviews), with minimal fees for permit applications and leasing. The bills do not require carriers to provide broadband access to everyone.

One state’s example

Here’s a snapshot of what happened in New Mexico: Just before the state’s 2018 legislative session began, in January, four lawmakers introduced the Wireless Consumer Infrastructure Investment Act, SB14/HB38. This “consumer” bill proposed eliminating zoning requirements. It reduced the permit application fee for a cell site (typically $1000) to $20. The cost of leasing a PROW (typically $1000-$2000/year) would shrink to $250 IF other lessees’ (i.e. cable companies) contracts are revised so that they also pay only $250/year. Otherwise, telecoms get free PROW access.

The bill did not limit the noise level of a site cabinet (28 cubic feet, containing many antennas and an air conditioner to keep the gear cool).

SB14/HB38 let telecoms apply for multiple permits at once and required NM municipalities to decide on applications within 30 days.

Effectively, the bill eliminated zoning requirements, reduced telecoms’ expenses and municipalities’ income and increased shareholders’ profits. It prioritized telecom infrastructure over all other development in New Mexico.

When the legislative session began, I sent a petition with 150 signatures opposing the bill to key lawmakers. I phoned a handful of senators’ and representatives’ offices and spoke with their aides. Most of them had not heard of the bill. One aide told me that she knew a “really smart couple” who lived near a cell tower and had a baby born with severe deformities.

“I’m so sorry,” I said. “But because of the 1996 Telecommunications Act’s Section 704, no health or environmental concern may interfere with the placement of a cellular antenna.”

She hadn’t known.

Another aide to a progressive lawmaker connected me to their policy analyst. The analyst (a lawyer) admitted that she didn’t understand telecom law well. She suggested a three-way conversation between her, me, and a “really nice” AT&T representative. “No thanks,” I managed. “AT&T’s agenda is to increase their profits. I need a public defender.”

Undeterred, the analyst asked the AT&T lobbyist to send me a packet with photos of “small” cellular antennas on traffic lights. None of them showed a 28 cubic foot cabinet nor a utility pole plastered with electronic gear beside a residence.

Aides told me to check the legislature’s website daily to find out when Committees would hear the bill. Several friends and I did that–but never found SB14/HB38 listed.

Mid-morning, February 7, an aide told me that the Senate Judiciary Committee would hear the Wireless Consumer Act that afternoon. She told me to phone her back after 1pm. At 1:15 pm, I learned that the Judiciary Committee would start at 1:30. I dashed to it.

If only I’d had a smartphone, a friend remarked later. I could’ve used Facebook to text my 150 co-petitioners to come and testify.

The room filled with nearly 100 lobbyists, policy analysts and aides. Nine senators faced the crowd. They heartily thanked the bill’s sponsoring senators and several AT&T lobbyists for their efforts. The sponsoring senators sat at a small table facing the panel.

Lobbyists from more than a half dozen corporations enthusiastically said that SB14 would help our beloved state’s economy. It would keep young people in New Mexico by giving them jobs.

A senator noticed the president of New Mexico’s Municipal League in the audience and asked for his position. The League had strongly opposed the bill, the man explained, until amendments were added that require telecoms to follow historic board and other zoning requirements. So, now, the League favored it.

What do these amendments say? Do they say that corporations must obey historic review…in good faith? Does the League just figure that this bill is the best they’ll get?

Only two audience members opposed the bill. Verizon’s lobbyist said, “The bill might work for AT&T, but Verizon can not afford the fees.”

At my turn, I gave each senator photos of a California woman in front of her home on January 12, 2018, beside a recently installed Verizon wireless cell signal booster and its in-ground utility box. According to the Santa Rosa Press Democrat, this woman had received no neighborhood notification before the cell site’s installation. Santa Rosa’s IT director said that the installation was quite different than the designs he’d been led to expect.

I explained that because 5G requires dense deployment, if the bill passed and four carriers deploy infrastructure, Santa Fe could expect 1496 new cell sites. Albuquerque 7000, Las Cruces 3000. If more than four carriers want to do business, we could see much higher numbers. Meanwhile, nothing in the bill obligates carriers to provide broadband to all New Mexicans. Unsure of my positions because of the Municipal League’s reversal, I still said that the bill takes away zoning requirements. It doesn’t require a licensed professional engineer (PE) to certify that each pole can bear the extra weight of equipment and cabinets. Then I took my seat. I could no longer question or comment on anything in the meeting. Immediately, I chastised myself for not raising questions about the energy demands of PROW-mounted wireless infrastructure. I wondered how I could get a note to any of the panelists mentioning the noise levels of the air conditioners in the cabinets, and their impact on peoples’ sleep.

The bill’s lead sponsoring senator spoke next. He said that the Act will make New Mexico’s broadband equal to that in other Western states and thereby will help our economy. And, according to the World Health Organization and numerous government agencies, exposure to cell site emissions causes no health problems.

Really? What qualifies this senator to know about EMR-exposure and health problems? What about the WHO’s International Agency for Research on Cancer calling cell phone radiation a possible carcinogen? What about the $25 million study from the National Toxicology Program (part of NIH) showing that cell phone radiation causes brain and heart tumors and damages DNA? What studies do you have about 24/7 exposure to millimeter waves? Also, doesn’t the 1996 Telecom Act prohibit you from using health as a reason to vote in favor or in opposition to a telecom bill?

Each senator on the panel then questioned the bill’s lead sponsor. Several asked, “If a cell site like the one in Santa Rosa showed up on the utility pole in my backyard, how could I get it removed?”

I moved to the edge of my seat.

The lead sponsor said that AT&T could better answer the question. He pulled up a chair for this man. Gave him a microphone. Mr. AT&T said that municipalities will be able to propose alternates to the cell site locations in the permit applications.

If a municipality gets an application from one provider with two hundred or more cell sites and must respond to it within thirty days, and no one wants a cell site beside their house or their kid’s school, what alternates would be possible?

“And,” AT&T’s man assured the senators, “the cell sites would not be deployed in residential areas.”

Really? Why not?

A senator persisted. If one did show up in his yard, what could he do?

“You could make a comment,” AT&T’s lobbyist said.

A senator proposed a “do pass.” All but one voted in favor of the bill.

On Sunday, February 11, the Santa Fe New Mexican‘s legislative roundup reported that several lawmakers received more emails about a proposal to require two license plates on each vehicle than about any other piece of legislation.

The Wireless Consumer Infrastructure Investment Act passed all of its requisite committees. Senate and House versions were negotiated to make a unified bill. The Senate Majority Leader and the Speaker of the House voted against the amended Wireless Consumer Act; but they were definitively outnumbered. The Act passed, and the governor signed it into law on February 28.

Around the U.S.

More than 23 states have passed bills that streamline the process of permitting telecoms’ PROW access.

California’s informed and activist citizenry (vocal that it wants secure, safe, affordable web access and landlines maintained) got Governor Jerry Brown to veto SB649 on October 15, 2017. Still, cities like Santa Rosa have cell sites cropping up without neighborhood notification or public hearings. Verizon recently proposed installing 92 new cell sites in Palo Alto. A woman in New York state looked up from washing dishes and saw a cell site getting installed on the utility pole near her kitchen.

Then, on March 23, less than 24 hours after receiving the 2232 page “Omnibus Bill,” the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2018, Congress passed it and the president signed it–though no one read it. The bill includes “Repack Airwaves Yielding Better Access for Users of Modern Services Act of 2018,” the RAY BAUM’S Act. RAY BAUM’S scraps review requirements like the National Environmental Policy Act and the National Historic Preservation Act. Even if a cell site will sit in a floodplain, as long as “certain conditions” are met, telecoms won’t need to submit an environmental assessment or a safety assessment of the facility.

While state and local rules will still apply, if regional regulations are relatively light, then the new federal rules could lead to environmental harms.

The National Resource Defense Council (NRDC) has set the stage to fight the “unlawful” RAY BAUM ACT in court. Likewise, the National Trust for Historic Preservation claims that the FCC does not have “legal authority” to eliminate historic review requirements.

What is happening here?

Dr. Gary Olhoeft, professor emeritus of geophysics and electrical engineering at the Colorado School of Mines asks, “When technology changes so fast, regulation can’t keep up. We can’t guarantee that we ‘First do no harm.’”

Naomi Klein calls fast, ubiquitous policy and tech changes like this “shock doctrine.” Her recent piece about what’s happening in Puerto Rico, “The Battle for Paradise,” describes communities struggling for food, electricity, and schools while speculators try to privatize the island’s services and make it a hub for minimally taxed bitcoin development.

Options for the public good

Modern systems’ complexity makes every community vulnerable to privatizing the very provisions that create community.

To create affordable, more secure and healthier Internet access, municipalities like Chatanooga, Tennessee and Longmont, Colorado have organized to deliver fiber optics-to-the-premises as a public utility. Fort Collins, Colorado just passed a bill to do so. San Francisco, Boulder, Traverse City and others are working on it.

Dr. Tim Schoechle advocates for it in his new book, Re-Inventing Wires: The Future of Landlines and Networks.

Satoko Kishimoto and Olivier Petitjean’s 2017 book, Reclaiming Public Services, reports 835 examples of (re)municiaplization of public services worldwide.

This is our choice: municipalities can wait until they have undeniable crises like the ones Puerto Rico faces–or begin now to reclaim public services, including Internet access. David Morris of The Institute for Local Self-Reliance advocates such ownership here.

Other News

Smart meters

Ashley Schannauer, the Hearing Officer for the New Mexico Public Regulatory Commission, has advised its five commissioners to vote against the state’s largest utility (PNM’s) proposal to install smart meters.  Schannauer noted in his report that no other U.S. regulatory commission has denied a smart meter request. There will be a month of rebuttals, followed by a vote from the five commissioners.

Energy

Kris de Decker’s newest paper, “How Much Energy Do We Need?” advocates for ceilings on energy use, not just minimum requirements.

The Global Union Against Radiation Deployment from Space (GUARDS) reports that thirteen companies are competing to cover the Earth with high-speed wireless Internet access from low-orbit satellites within two years. Launching 20,000 rockets for satellites could drastically deplete the ozone and speed climate change.

Plattsburgh, NY could become the first U.S. municipality to put a moratorium on Bitcoin mining. Electricity’s been cheap in Plattburgh; the hundreds or thousands of computers that crunch math problems to generate bitcoins eat up “tons” of electricity. If they continue in Plattsburgh, the town will need millions to upgrade its infrastructure.

the public health

Dr. Joel Moskowitz from UC Berkley’s School of Public Health, provided some context to the results of the National Toxicology Program (NTP)’s studies on cell phone radiation.

An Italian study of rats exposed to GSM cell phone radiation shows significant increase in males’ heart tumors; and this is consistent with NTPs’ results.

study of humans from Kaiser Permanente in Oakland, California, shows that exposure to magnetic field levels commonly found in homes and workplaces increases the risk of miscarriage.

Forbes recently posted an infographic about which smartphones emit the most radiation.

Please contribute! to keep this newsletter going. Annually, we spend $4000 for web hosting, site and mailing list maintenance. Katie Singer’s paper about the Internet’s exponentially increasing footprint (and how to curtail it) will be published at the end of June. Donations are welcome through PayPal. If you’d like a tax deduction for your contribution, please contact Katie Singer by replying to this newsletter.

Thanks to everyone who uses technology as safely as possible, reduces their energy use and EMR emmissions.

To healthier ecosystems and safer communities,
Katie Singer
http://www.electronicsilentspring.com

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Cellular radiation linked to brain and heart tumours

Cellular radiation linked to brain and heart tumours

The study involved male and female rats, which were exposed from prenatal life until natural death to a 1.8GHz GSM far field for 19 hours per day.

The whole-body exposure of the 1.8GHz GSM far field radiation included strengths of 0, 5, 25, and 50V/m.

The 1.8GHz spectrum band is widely used by cellular operators to deliver mobile voice and data services.

This is the largest long-term study ever performed in rats on the health effects of radiofrequency radiation.

Results

The study found a statistically significant increase in the incidence of heart cancer tumours in treated male rats at the highest dose (50 V/m).

Furthermore, an increase in the incidence of heart Schwann cells hyperplasia was observed in treated male and female rats at the highest dose (50 V/m), although this was not statistically significant.

An increase in the incidence of brain tumours was observed in treated female rats at the highest dose (50 V/m), although not statistically significant.

The researchers said their findings reinforce the results of near field exposure, which shows that cellular radiation increase the incidence of tumours of the brain and heart in rats.

“These tumours are of the same histotype of those observed in some epidemiological studies on cellphone users,” said the researchers.

Call to reevaluate radiofrequency radiation cancer links

The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) has previously classified radiofrequency radiation (RFR) as a possible human carcinogen.

According to the IARC, animals studies, as well as epidemiological ones, showed limited evidence of carcinogenicity linked to cellular radiation.

The researchers said the latest research provides sufficient evidence to call for the reevaluation of IARC conclusions regarding the carcinogenic potential of radiofrequency radiation in humans.

New International Organization Alerte Phonegate

Dear All-
Please take heart.  Things are moving along.  I would like to make you aware of the new organization Alerte Phonegate, while it is based in France.  They are taking action internationally.  You should sign up for their newsletter and notices directly since I will not be able to re-circulate them all.  See the excerpts of the letter they send to the FCC along with the Environmental Health Trust.  They are doing great work.  Please help get the word out through social media and to the news media.  The letter to the FCC is a particularly good one to get into the hands of the news media.
 
Unfortunately, device safety does not address the effects we all experience from second-hand or ambient radiation levels.  Just as with smoking, use of wireless technology by anybody, exposes everyone whether they consent to it or not to the health hazard that that second-hand radiation exposure entails.  Those risks are not insignificant for us or for the environment.  To quote from the recent GUARDS press release ( www.stopglobalwifi.org/documents/RocketExhaustMarch2018full.pdf ), “While public focus has been on the safety of wireless device users, an increasing number of studies show second-hand or ambient radiation levels negatively effecting endocrinecardiacneurological and other biological functions, as well as harming wildlife and plants.”     It is important that everyone realize this.  Societal norms regarding smoking only changed as it was realized that smokers were not just making health choices for themselves, but also for everyone around them while they smoked.  This is even more true for wireless technology users.
 
I have also pasted a letter below from Dafna of We Are The Evidence raising awareness about Michigan state Senator Patrick Colbeck’s courageous speech reminding his fellow legislators that their most sacred trust was to protect public health and that there is evidence that 5G is not safe.  Please send the link to his speech to your legislators and congresspeople and ask that they also speak out.  Send them the European 5G Appeal which enjoys broad support among knowledgeable scientists and doctors (Cover letter with links to the Appeal pasted below.)  They can also find good information at http://whatis5g.info/ and www.EHTrust.org.
 
Please help raise awareness.
 
Thank you,
Catherine 
____________________________________________________________________________________________
Hi All
The people in Michigan have done a phenomenal job objecting the 5G legislation that sadly passed the Senate today despite all the overwhelming evidence of harm – scientific and human.
HOWEVER, one person, a real human being, stood out and up – Senator Patrick Coleback. Senator Colbeck’s speech should be heard by every legislator in the country. His speech may awaken them and remind them of their supreme duty to protect the health of the people and that not doing so is a violation of the states’ constitution. His speech is the FIRST SPEECH by any legislator in this country who finally spoke the truth about wireless health effects loud and clear.
The following words by Senator Colbeck should be written in stone:
“Article 4 section 51 of the Michigan Constitution States: ‘the public health and the general welfare of the people of the state are hereby declared to be a matter of primary public concern. The legislature shall pass suitable laws for the protection and promotion of public health.’ Despite the convenience and theenormous economic growth potential associated with the Internet of Things OUR PRIMARY CONCERN ASLEGISLATORS is NOT CONVENIENCE, NOR ECONOMIC GROWTH. As much as I love technology as per our Michigan constitution the PUBLIC HEALTH AND THE GENERAL WELFARE OF the PEOPLE OF OUR STATE ARE SUPPOSED TO BE OUR PRIMARY CONCERN”.
He also said:
“This convenience comes at a price and it comes at the price to the health of many of our citizens most notably children babies in the womb and even adults who suffer from hyper sensitivity to wireless transitions”.
“A few weeks ago I distributed sample data to each of you from scientific studies…complied by bioinitiative,org. ..the adverse health effects are very serious.”
“Many of us are rightly concerned about the hazards of cigarattes, lead levels..and other harmful substances…but I regreat to inform you that we need to add electromagnetic radiaiton from wireless technology to this list”
Please put a LIKE to the speech.
Please send him thank you email to :  SenPColbeck@senate.michigan.gov
Please share with your State Legislators and with your state’s memebers of Congress.
Thank you Senator Colbeck. After 5 years of tireless work on this topic, fighting for the truth to be heard and to save the lives of the people of our world, this is only the second time I’ve heard a legislator speaks the truth and I had tears. Thank you for speaking the truth.


Dafna Tachover, Managing Director
Attorney (NY, Israel), MBA
Phone: (845) 377 0211
——————————————–
 
Phonegate* : First international actions of the association “Alerte Phonegate”
23 March 2018
Our action has now taken form with the creation of an association governed by the law of 1901, called « Alerte Phonegate » and whose notice was published in the Journal officiel des associations et fondations d’entreprises (Official Journal for Associations and Business Foundations) of March 10, 2018.
The purpose of the new organization is to establish, both in France and Europe as well as internationally, a network of individuals, organizations and communities fighting for the recognition, protection and defense of the health of users of mobile phones within the framework, inter alia, of the health and industrial scandal called “Phonegate”.
The constitutive General Assembly has appointed as Founding President, Dr. Marc Arazi, who is proud of this vote of confidence, “…thanks to the many qualified individuals and organizations who have already agreed to actively participate in the important work ahead to alert international institutions and propose appropriate measures to protect the health of more than 6 billion mobile phone users.”
While the first two interventions of Alerte Phonegate are intended for the United States, in reality they concern all of us, so much are public health issues cross-linked today.
When asked “What is the SAR limit violation of which the public will be informed by the FDA that cell phones violate US regulatory SAR limits?” The FDA did not respond. Will the FDA act if a phone exceeds the regulatory limit by 5 times or 10 times or 20 times? How high does the radiation SAR value need to go to trigger an FDA response? However, instead of responding to the question asked on October 18, 2017, Dr. Daniel Kassiday,​ ​Radiation Safety Engineer, wrote on behalf of the FDA, “At this time the FDA has no concerns about the regulatory safety limit set by the FCC.”
The FDA has been fully informed that regulatory limits can be violated by common consumer behavior and has failed in its duty to protect public health.
Furthermore, the FDA has stated that the National Toxicology Program findings of increased tumors in rats is not applicable to health risks to people—discounting the association with cancer—allegedly because the NTP used higher exposures than those to which people are exposed. However, the French tests show that, in fact, people can receive exposures that are higher than those used in the 2-year NTP bioassay—between 3 to 12 times higher than the recommended limits—to the areas of their bodies where they hold the phone in contact with their body. Thus, contrary to what FDA replied in their letter of 2017, the NTP study findings are directly relevant to human health, especially when you consider that children will have a lifetime of exposure and they and many adults sleep with their phones, unaware of the radiation exposure.
Protecting our health and the environment by using a hardwired computer in a low RF environment.  For more information, see www.electricalpollution.com
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