Cellular radiation linked to brain and heart tumours

Cellular radiation linked to brain and heart tumours

The study involved male and female rats, which were exposed from prenatal life until natural death to a 1.8GHz GSM far field for 19 hours per day.

The whole-body exposure of the 1.8GHz GSM far field radiation included strengths of 0, 5, 25, and 50V/m.

The 1.8GHz spectrum band is widely used by cellular operators to deliver mobile voice and data services.

This is the largest long-term study ever performed in rats on the health effects of radiofrequency radiation.

Results

The study found a statistically significant increase in the incidence of heart cancer tumours in treated male rats at the highest dose (50 V/m).

Furthermore, an increase in the incidence of heart Schwann cells hyperplasia was observed in treated male and female rats at the highest dose (50 V/m), although this was not statistically significant.

An increase in the incidence of brain tumours was observed in treated female rats at the highest dose (50 V/m), although not statistically significant.

The researchers said their findings reinforce the results of near field exposure, which shows that cellular radiation increase the incidence of tumours of the brain and heart in rats.

“These tumours are of the same histotype of those observed in some epidemiological studies on cellphone users,” said the researchers.

Call to reevaluate radiofrequency radiation cancer links

The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) has previously classified radiofrequency radiation (RFR) as a possible human carcinogen.

According to the IARC, animals studies, as well as epidemiological ones, showed limited evidence of carcinogenicity linked to cellular radiation.

The researchers said the latest research provides sufficient evidence to call for the reevaluation of IARC conclusions regarding the carcinogenic potential of radiofrequency radiation in humans.

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.