Customer in power struggle with NES over smart meter

Customer in power struggle with NES over smart meter

CHEATHAM COUNTY, Tenn. — A Cheatham County family is without power for six weeks and counting because of a decision Nashville Electric Service has made.
The NES is trying to change the family’s meter to an updated digital smart meter, along with hundreds of thousands of others across the mid state.
NES Customer Jeff Jacobson’s family often spends the weekdays at home without him except for one February day, when Nashville Electric Service paid a visit.

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CHEATHAM COUNTY, Tenn. — A Cheatham County family is without power for six weeks and counting because of a decision Nashville Electric Service has made.
The NES is trying to change the family’s meter to an updated digital smart meter, along with hundreds of thousands of others across the mid state.
NES Customer Jeff Jacobson’s family often spends the weekdays at home without him except for one February day, when Nashville Electric Service paid a visit.
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“Luckily I was home,” Jacobson said. “It was during the weekday in the middle of the day, and I asked him what he was doing. He says ‘I’m installing a new meter.'”
Jacobson’s home is among more than 380,000 NES customers slated for the change. NES has already installed about 220,000 AMI smart meters.
Low radio frequency radiation repeatedly comes to and from these devices, making it possible for data collection without a visit from a meter reader. That’s among the benefits that NES explained to Fox 17 in a written statement.
Jacobson had no warning or chance to refuse this type of meter prior to this visit.
“I said no, I’m not gonna have that on the house,” Jacobson said. “I don’t consent to that. He went as far as to tell me that he was going to call the sheriff’s department and have them help NES force it onto my home.”
He’s since built a barricade around it. NES has cut his power, citing the meter as a safety issue.
“The power was disconnected at Jacobson’s home because he tampered with the meter, which included caging it, to prevent NES access to their equipment” said NES Spokesperson Holden Sheriff in an e-mail to Fox 17. “This poses a safety concern to the customer and NES.”
The situation is not ideal, but Jacobson said it’s worth it citing past cases of fires.
At least a dozen states in the US have banned or have been in legal fights against these meters for years. Many across the country have claimed government overreach, or blamed illnesses and diseases like cancer on the devices.
At this point, there is no conclusive evidence that there is or is not a connection between these issues and smart meters.
Jacobson and his family are happy being off the grid, if it sheds light on this to others.
NES has given Jacobson a deferral option. He could pay a fee plus additional monthly costs to continue using his current meter, but NES could still change his meter at a later date without notice.
“Customers who defer are charged a monthly fee on $32, which covers the cost to send a meter to the residence to read the usage data,” a spokesperson for NES said.
NES said only 23 customers have decided to defer so far.
Jacobson wants anyone else who is passionate about this issue to call him at 615-715-8934.

http://fox17.com/news/local/customer-in-power-struggle-with-nes-over-smart-meter

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Union claims Oncor violated worker’s rights in row over ‘smart meter’ testimony

WESTLAW NEWS | Mon Apr 10, 2017 | 5:38pm EDT
Union claims Oncor violated worker’s rights in row over ‘smart meter’ testimony
By Robert Iafolla
An affiliate of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers has told a federal appeals court that an electrical utility company in Texas broke federal labor law by firing a worker for his testimony raising safety concerns about digital “smart meters” at a state legislative hearing.

The union urged the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit in a brief filed Friday to affirm a National Labor Relations Board decision finding that former Oncor Electric Delivery Co employee Bobby Reed retained the protection of the National Labor Relations Act when he testified and that his firing for what he said about the meters was unlawful.

To read the full story on WestlawNext Practitioner Insights, click here: bit.ly/2o18hog

Letter: Speak out against smart meters

Letter: Speak out against smart meters

By Submitted
Email the author
Published 1:00 am Monday, April 10, 2017

I read in the flier that Freeborn-Mower Cooperative Services sends out about meter changes in Albert Lea. I believe that these new smart meters are being installed for the following reasons. First, let me say, I think privacy issues are involved in that these new smart meters are collecting information on power usage — not on a monthly schedule, but possible on a six-second cycle. What is to prevent the utility company charging customers more during their peak hours, for using their appliances? For families that work, that have no other time to do laundry, but until they get home. Say it is a peak alert, what is to prevent the utilities from charging, say, triple the price? The utility company knows exactly when the power is used. Anybody who hacks into the system can tell if that person is home or not.

The people who vacation every winter in the South — snow birds — would be perfect for burglaries. Power usage indicates that no one is home. Remember the newspaper article recently about the burglar who went to the theater parking lot, checked out the license plates on cars, then went home and got on the computer? Knowing where those people lived, burglarized their homes, while they enjoyed the theater.

Radiation emitted from smart meters is 100 times greater than cellphones. Now consider every home, and every business in the U.S., emitting this radiation into the environment, with constant exposure. These hazardous electronic waves can damage the nervous system. There are other health concerns such as cancer, etc. I don’t want a constant burst of radiation. If the sole purpose of Freeborn-Mower is to save on labor and vehicle use expenses, then there is no need to emit constant electronic waves. It could be like the water meter, read once a month. At least the public would not get constant exposure. Then Freeborn-Mower would have total usage — and not the increments — so they knew exactly when power was used, and when the house was unoccupied.

I don’t like the privacy issues, but there is no reason to monitor every hour and how much energy is used, unless in the future, the reason is to charge customers who can’t control the hours of usage due to work/sleep hours. I don’t like the health implications. At my age, I will not be exposed as long as my grandchildren. There is not need to constantly emit hazardous radiation. We must think of future generations, as well as our own. Please consider calling your City Council members and register your complaint. Freeborn-Mower must be under the city’s license to operate, I would assume. Let’s see what can be done.

Terry Sippel

Albert Lea

http://www.albertleatribune.com/2017/04/letter-speak-out-against-smart-meters/