Anxiety and Panic Attacks Becoming More Prevalent

Anxiety and Panic Attacks Becoming More Prevalent

September 29, 2016 | 260,281 views

By Dr. Mercola

EXCERPTS:

According to research1 published in 2015, anxiety (characterized by constant and overwhelming worry and fear) is becoming increasingly prevalent in the U.S., now eclipsing all forms of cancer by 800 percent.

Data from the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) suggests the prevalence of anxiety disorders in the U.S. — which include generalized anxiety disorder, social anxiety and panic disorder — may be as high as 40 million, or about 18 percent of the population over the age of 18, making it the most common mental illness in the nation.2,3

According to research by the Center for Collegiate Mental Health at Penn State, anxiety has also surpassed depression as the most commonly diagnosed mental health problem among college students, with more than 50 percent of students visiting campus clinics reporting anxiety.

A number of other situations and underlying issues can also contribute to the problem. This includes but is not limited to the following, and addressing these issues may be what’s needed to resolve your anxiety disorder. For more information about each, please follow the hyperlinks:

Exposure to cell phones, and nonnative electromagnetic fields (EMF) and radiofrequencies (RF) Food additives, food dyes, GMOs and glyphosate.

Food dyes of particular concern include Blue #1 and #2 food coloring; Green #3; Orange B; Red #3 and #40; Yellow #5 and #6; and the preservative sodium benzoate

Gut dysfunction caused by imbalanced microflora Lack of magnesium, vitamin D8 and/or animal-based omega-3.

(Research has shown a 20 percent reduction in anxiety among medical students taking omega-3s9)

Use of artificial sweeteners Excessive consumption of sugar and junk food
Improper breathing Exposure to toxic mold
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