Mysterious Hum

The is not science; it is guessing and using statistics that are not relevant to the current HUM cause.

The Modern Day HUM has not been accurately represented or studied.   The Modern Day HUM is caused by the smart grid PLC which was not “turned on” until approximately 2006.   More than 50% of the people complaining about smart meters can hear the buzzing, ringing and humming. This is not specific to an age group.

The Hum was always reported in certain areas at a time, reporting it came and went; most likely related to the grid. The Modern Day HUM is in the air 24/7 and present during major power outages. This was forensically measured to prove this to be true because the smart grid communication uses Radio frequencies, which never turns off.  In this current day; the hum is heard across the USA and worldwide.  The consistent thread is the exposure to the Electric Grid, regardless of how many cell base stations, antennas, gas pipe lines, industry, major roadways, etc. because this all varies in comparison.  The grid does not!  The noise does not change or stop.  These are the markers and this is what we should be studying and focusing on because it has already proven to be the source of the problem….Sandaura

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Mysterious Hum Driving People Crazy Around the World

Who hears the Hum?

Only about 2 percent of the people living in any given Hum-prone area can hear the sound, and most of them are ages 55 to 70, according to a 2003 study by acoustical consultant Geoff Leventhall of Surrey, England.

Most of the people who hear the Hum (sometimes referred to as “hearers” or “hummers”) describe the sound as similar to a diesel engine idling nearby. And the Hum has driven virtually every one of them to the point of despair. [Video: Listen to 6 Spooky Sounds]

“It’s a kind of torture; sometimes, you just want to scream,” retiree Katie Jacques of Leeds, England, told the BBC. Leeds is one of several places in Great Britain where the Hum has recently appeared.

http://www.livescience.com/38427-the-hum-mystery-taos-hum.html

PLC NOISE AND IMPEDANCE MEASUREMENTS ON LOADS AND IN THE DISTRIBUTION GRID

Power Line communication is not compatible with electric distribution.  This paper is disturbing because it is recognizing the noise issues, but they want to blame it on consumer appliances.  The PLC technology is the source of the noise that is now ubiquitous in our air.  This issue did not exist prior to the Smart meter technology on the power lines.  It is too harsh an environment to expect otherwise.  As a result it is causing environmental pollution and audible torture to those who can hear this crap 24/7.  The engineers are never concerned or paid to do studies about the negative impact it has on the population, because they just want this crap regardless of the pain and suffering it is imposing….Sandaura

22nd International Conference on Electricity Distribution Stockholm, 10-13 June 2013

PLC NOISE AND IMPEDANCE MEASUREMENTS ON LOADS AND IN THE DISTRIBUTION GRID

Rafael JAHN Dries LEMMENS Wim FOUBERT

LABORELEC – Belgium LABORELEC – Belgium LABORELEC – Belgium

Rafael.Jahn@Laborelec.com Dries.Lemmens@Laborelec.com Wim.Foubert@Laborelec.com

Stijn UYTTERHOEVEN

LABORELEC – Belgium

Stijn.Uytterhoeven@Laborelec.com

EXCERPTS:

ABSTRACT

Power Line Communication is still one of the most popular ways to solve the last-mile problem in Smart Metering. The main drawbacks of this medium are the harsh circumstances in the grid. The unpredictability of noise and impedance in the grid makes it a difficult task to model the physical channel and therefore choose the right modulation technique for the job.

In this paper noise and impedance measurements are executed. This leads to a classification of the different types of loads in function of the basic parameters influencing power line communication.

THE IMPACT OF NOISE AND IMPEDANCE ON PLC SIGNALS

Power Line Communication is one of the solutions for the last-mile-problem for Smart Metering and Smart Grids. In order to support our clients in their pilot projects using PLC, a Toolbox was developed. Long-term monitoring of smart meters in the field gave insights in the communication quality and reliability. The daily and sometimes hourly fluctuations in meter accessibility needed further investigation. In the laboratory we were able to reproduce circumstances that prevent the meters from communicating by lowering the grid impedance or increase the amount of noise injected. The impedance variations are produced by an in-house developed load bench. The noise can be synthesized via our PLC Toolbox but it is also possible to play pre-recorded samples measured in the grid.